Back Pain

& Neck  Pain

Back Pain is an extremely prevalent condition in Greece as well as Europe. Incidence statistics show that 80% of the population will experience back pain at some point in their lifetime, with almost half the adult population experiencing some form of back pain every year. Back Pain can be caused by any number of reasons and identifying where the pain is coming from is the first step in effectively managing and treating the pain. For this reason, every new patient starts their treatment at our clinic with a full consultation and examination to determine what isn’t functioning correctly within their spine and to therefore identify the source of pain. This is especially important in the early stages of pain, as the identification and subsequent actions can prevent a condition becoming more severe or chronic. Neck injury or dysfunction can lead to symptoms that spread to other parts of your body. This means neck problems or pain can really impact your day-to-day life. The first step towards solving these issues is to find the cause of the pain, by examining whether the neck is degenerated in a certain area or if the neck structure is abnormal. This examination can also help us work out why previous treatments may not have worked.

Symptoms of a Back Injury

Back pain can affect people in different ways, and can vary from mild, intermittent or niggling pain, all the way to a chronic, disabling, severe pain. It is common to experience just one, or multiple of the following symptoms:​

  • Dull pain or aching

  • Sharp pain which can be a sudden, throbbing, burning or stabbing pain

  • Stiffness or loss of flexibility

  • Feeling compressed

  • Numbness or Pins and Needles'

  • Pain upon coughing or sneezing

  • Radiating or Referring Pain in different areas of the body

  • One sided, Right/Left or unilateral pain

  • Poor quality or Lack of Sleep

 

Cervical Pain & Symptoms

The neck or cervical spine are often thought as separately from the ‘back’ however the cervical vertebra as the upper most portion of the spine has a uniquely important function. The neck is a narrow extremity that connects our heavy head with our sturdy thorax, thus making it prone to absorbing large forces like those that occur during a whiplash scenario. However, the neck is highly influential in this modern day, in terms of its posture and the effect that poor positioning can have on the 15 billion nerve messages per minute that pass through this region.

Problems in the cervical region can cause pain locally but also can radiate tension causing upper middle back pain as well as being responsible for a large number of headaches, irritation to the discs and nerves often result in a neurological pain that is transmitted into the shoulder and down the arm, forearm wrist and hands. In addition to headaches neck problems are also linked with Jaw Pain, sinus issues, dizziness, poor energy levels, lack of concentration as well as a lack of, or poor-quality sleep.

Conditions that affect the cervical spine are:

  • Degenerative Disc Diseas

  • Slipped lumbar disc (rare)

  • Spinal Stenosis

  • Spondylosis – a descriptive term for degeneration in the disc

  • Spondylolisthesis – where a vertebra slips out of position forwards

  • Compression Fracture

  • Posterior arch Fracture (referral straight to A&E)

  • Fracture (relatively common amongst elderly/osteoporotic patients)

  • Muscle Strains

  • Cranial Nerve Compression (compression of the cranial nerves by aging arteries and veins)

  • Myofascial syndrome

 

Thoracic Pain & Symptoms

Pain in the middle back, also known as the thoracic region, is somewhat different to the top and base of the spine as it is the area which has attached the rib bones, in order to protect your vital organs. The mid back, due to being twelve segments long, is often differentiated into the upper middle back (relating primarily to neck and arm pain) and the lower middle back (relating primarily to the lower back and hip pain).

Conditions that specifically cause lower middle back pain are:

• Degenerative Disc Disease

• Slipped lumbar disc (rare)

• Facet Joint Syndrome

• Fracture (relatively common amongst elderly/osteoporotic patients)

• Muscle Strains

• Maigne’s Syndrome (Unilateral pain referring down into lower back and hip)

• Myofascial syndrome

Conditions that specifically cause Upper Middle Back Pain are:

  • Degenerative Disc Disease

  • Slipped lumbar disc (rare)

  • Facet Joint Syndrome

  • Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (a condition which causes pain in the neck, shoulders, or arms due to compressed nerves and or blood vessels around the neck)

  • T4 syndrome (an unusual dysfunction in the upper middle back that directly radiates pain down the arm)

  • NB/ Upper Middle Back Pain has close links to posture and a rounded kyphosis or increased spinal curve in this area can have considerable effects on neck and lower back pain as well as vice versa.

 

Lumber Pain & Symptoms

There are a wide number of conditions that affect the lower back, also known as the lumbar region. Whilst pain is often local to the joint or tissue that is dysfunctioning, it is also common to experience referred or radicular pain due to the nervous system that flows through the lower back. In these cases, pain generally follows the nerve pathways and flows down from the lower back, into the buttocks, legs, calves or feet.  Our clinic is here to help you with your needs, when you need it.

Conditions that affect the lower back include:

  • Degenerative Disc Disease

  • Slipped lumbar disc (rare)

  • Spinal Stenosis

  • Spondylosis – a descriptive term for degeneration in the discs

  • Spondylolisthesis – where a vertebra slips out of position forwards

  • Retrolisthesis – where a vertebra slips out of position backwards

  • Facet Joint Syndrome

  • Compression Fracture

  • Muscle Strains

  • Sacroiliac joint syndrome

  • Pathological problem (or more serious underlying condition)

  • Myofascial syndrome

 

Hip & Sciatic Pain  & Symptoms

Sacral and hip pain is a major problem that plagues all age groups.  Whilst pain is often local to the joint or tissue that is dysfunctioning, it is also common to experience referred or radicular pain due to the nervous system that flows through the lower back. In these cases, pain generally follows the nerve pathways and flows down from the lower back, into the buttocks, legs, calves or feet.  Leg pain associated with radiculating numbness is at times generalised as leg pain sciatica.

Conditions that affect the Sacral and Hip Region:

  • Piriformis Syndrome

  • PSOAS muscle injuries

  • Sciatica

  • Osteoarthritis

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis